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Monthly Archives

April 2018

Slow Cooker Lemon Chicken Bowls with Cauliflower Rice and Avocado

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My Slow Cooker Lemon Chicken Bowls are the ultimate easy, weeknight recipe! And, it screams SPRING!

I cannot even believe how easy this is to make. Really. I can’t. It took me 5 minutes to get it into the slow cooker and another 5 minutes to finish it up and serve.

Everything is made in the slow cooker – no extra dishes for prep… Well, except a whisk and a knife. Okay, are you convinced yet? It’s SO easy! 🙂

But aside from being easy, it is DE-licious!

I made this one evening for dinner and it had just gotten up to about 84 degrees in Dallas. It’s been in the 40’s in the mornings so 84 felt hot! So honestly? The last thing I wanted was a bowl of something hot. And I was kind of bummed that I had chosen this dish for dinner. I wanted something cool and refreshing. But guess what? This was that exactly! I served it over raw greens (I chose spinach because we LOVE spinach, but you could use any dark, leafy greens you like…) and it was so good – astringent, if you will. Which is how we should be eating this time of year… Cleansing, astringent foods.

This is the time of year for citrus, fresh fruits, raw produce, etc. You’ll see so much beautiful produce in the grocery stores right now! We LOVE this time of year!

We hope you enjoy this recipe as much as we do!

Slow Cooker Lemon Chicken Bowls with Cauliflower Rice and Avocado

Serves: 4-6

Ingredients:

  • 2lbs organic chicken breasts
  • 1 quart low sodium, organic chicken bone broth
  • zest and juice of 2 large lemons
  • 1 yellow onion, chopped
  • 1 tbsp raw/local honey
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tbsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • pinch of cayenne pepper
  • real salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 1 pre-washed container spinach or baby kale
  • 2, 10oz bags cauliflower rice
  • 1 large avocado
  • several cilantro or parsley leaves

Directions:

  • In the bowl of your slow cooker, place the broth, zest and juice of the lemons, onion, honey, garlic powder, coriander, oregano, cayenne, salt and black pepper. Whisk well to combine.
  • Place the chicken into the slow cooker and “nuzzle” down into the sauce so the chicken is almost completely covered.
  • Set slow cooker to low for 6 hours or high for 4 hours.
  • Approximately 1 hour before the crockpot tells you it’s done, take two forks and gently shred the chicken to pull apart into desired-size pieces and add in cauliflower rice and stir to combine. Cover again and let it continue to cook.
  • To serve, place 1 handful spinach/baby kale on the bottom of a bowl and top with a big helping of the lemon chicken/cauliflower rice. Garnish with avocado and fresh cilantro or parsley leaves.
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Instructions
  1. In the bowl of your slow cooker, place the broth, zest and juice of the lemons, onion, honey, garlic powder, coriander, oregano, cayenne, salt and black pepper. Whisk well to combine.
  2. Place the chicken into the slow cooker and “nuzzle” down into the sauce so the chicken is almost completely covered.
  3. Set slow cooker to low for 6 hours or high for 4 hours.
  4. Approximately 1 hour before the crockpot tells you it’s done, take two forks and gently shred the chicken to pull apart into desired-size pieces and add in cauliflower rice and stir to combine. Cover again and let it continue to cook.
  5. To serve, place 1 handful spinach/baby kale on the bottom of a bowl and top with a big helping of the lemon chicken/cauliflower rice. Garnish with avocado and fresh cilantro or parsley leaves.
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Mindset & Meditation: Rehearsing Responses to Emotional Triggers

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Rehearsing Responses to Emotional Triggers…

 

In the book “Breaking the Habit of Being Yourself”, Dr. Joe Despenza talks about rehearsing how you “want” to react to a particular situation.  Just as you may visualize yourself performing a physical activity or mentally rehearsing a race or sport, you must rehearse your communication and/or responses to an emotional trigger situation.  Dispenza says that if you want to be or act a certain way, create it in your mind and rehearse it.

 

I will use myself as an example. I have a very bad habit when someone challenges my opinion or disagrees with me to get VERY defensive and react abruptly and aggressively with a response.  I don’t want to react that way, but I have been this way most of my life.  Instead of giving up and saying, “that’s just how I am”, I instead assess past situations and then create a calmer, more appropriate response. I first tell myself that the person disagreeing or challenging me isn’t doing so out of hate or malice, they simply have a different opinion or maybe are simply asking for clarification.  I then mentally rehearse how I would have, and will now, respond differently.  I do this in my mind during a meditation and by doing so I begin to literally rewire my brain to respond better.  If I just think to myself “I don’t want to snap at people, I want to/should respond better”, I am not creating dialog and a proper mental response. Like anything it takes practice, and I can tell you that it works! I have been much more successful in responding vs. reacting to situations.

 

Use mental rehearsal before going into a difficult meeting with a client, friend, or boss where you know you would normally be angry, afraid, etc. Create your response to other drivers on the road. One thing that helped me long ago was something my karate sensei taught us.  He said “when someone reacts negatively towards you, says something rude, or someone cuts you off in traffic, instead of reacting aggressively with a counter attack think to yourself, maybe this person has had a really bad day, maybe they just found out some really bad news.  Show them grace and be kind.” I have done that several times and it’s really cool how you feel after.  My point with that story is CREATE your response to those situations now if that’s your trigger.   Try this. The next time someone cuts you off in traffic, instead of telling them there “number one” with your special finger simply smile, maybe wave and literally say out loud “I hope everything is ok and you get where you are going safely”.  Trust me on this one.  It’s a really good feeling.

Episode 152: Alyssa Hawley Recaps a Gritty Seattle Super & Talks Mental Focus

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In this episode Spartan Pro Alyssa Hawley gives us a detailed review of the recent Seattle Super, which was full of mud and failed obstacles by all.

We also talk about:

– Her mental coaching and how she “calmed her mental chatter”

– How to stay present during a race and not focus on what’s ahead or obstacles missed

– How coaching athletes through there first Spartan race has brought a whole new meaning to OCR races

– The importance of self talk pre-race in preparing for difficult situations, failed obstacles, challenges during a race

– And fun facts about Kangaroos and someone’s obsession over wallaby’s 🙂

***Disclaimer*** Due to an audio issue Alyssa’s voice has a slight echo. Our apologies.

 

CLICK HERE to listen or download from iTunes or Stitcher

A Healthier Panzanella Salad

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Ok – so let me preface with – this is not a “true” Panzanella salad in every sense of the word. There is not near the amount of bread that is in a typical Panzanella and I’ve added greens in lieu of all of the bread. Nor did I marinade the croutons in tomato juices, etc. BUT, it eats like a Panzanella. Everything is in big pieces and the juices from the roasted tomatoes create some of the dressing and that seeps into the croutons and mmm… I mean, I can’t get enough!

This is one of those salads I crave at least once a week. It is one of my favorite and easiest meals to make. And yes, I just called a salad a meal and I promise you will feel this way once you’ve had this one!

Mo and I are eaters. Foodies for sure. But we really like to eat food. 🙂 So if you haven’t made any of my other salads and therefore you’re not “in the know” yet – you can trust that my salads are not for the faint of heart. This definitely took some convincing with Mo when I first started cooking for him. This is where the “inside joke” of “We’re having a ‘big salad’ for dinner…” came from. When I was racing triathlon a bunch and had a full load of clients, etc., etc. salads were an almost nightly thing at our house! But if you ask Mo – he loves them. They are filling, full of nutrition and full of flavor and texture! …I’m big on texture! Gotta have some crunch!

So this salad pulls out my Italian heritage. As I said, it is not an exact replica of a true Panzanella salad. But, the anti-inflammatory nutritionist in me cannot help myself, plus, we really like it better this way!

Hope you enjoy this as much as we do!

Primal Panzanella Salad

Serves 2-4

Ingredients for the Salad:

  • 1lb free range chicken breast, cubed
  • 1/3 cup + 2 tbsp balsamic vinegar, divided
  • zest and juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • ¾ large container pre-washed baby spinach
  • 8-10 fresh basil leaves, julienned
  • 1 large shallot, very thinly sliced
  • ½ cup goat cheese crumbles
  • 1 large avocado, diced into large pieces
  • 1 ½ cups baby cherry tomatoes
  • 2-3 pieces good sourdough bread, cut into large pieces
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil, divided
  • Real Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • ½ – 1 tsp red pepper flakes (optional)

Directions for the Salad:

  • Place chicken a large Ziploc baggie with 1/3 cup balsamic vinegar, lemon zest and juice, oregano and ½ tsp salt and ¼ tsp black pepper. Seal bag and gently toss (over the sink – yes, I’ve learned the hard way! J) to combine. Marinade for 30 minutes, up to overnight. Pull out of the fridge 30 minutes prior to cooking.
  • Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F and line two small sheet pans with foil.
  • While oven is heating up, on one sheet pan, place the tomatoes and on the other sheet pan, lay the sourdough out, in an even layer. Drizzle the tomatoes and sourdough with ½ tbsp olive oil each and sprinkle both with salt and black pepper. Set the croutons aside and place the tomatoes into the oven to roast for 7-10 minutes until slightly browned and starting to burst open.
  • Using tongs, pull the chicken out of the bag and place each piece in an even layer, without touching, onto a large nonstick skillet over medium heat; discard the remaining marinade. Let cook for 2-3 minutes per side, until each piece is cooked through.
  • Meanwhile, in a large salad/serving bowl place spinach, basil, goat cheese and avocado.
  • When you’re ready to pull the tomatoes out of the oven, place sourdough on the top rack of the oven to toast for 2-3 minutes and pour the tomatoes, while hot, in with the spinach and then add the chicken.
  • Drizzle remaining olive oil and balsamic over the top and toss gently to combine and coat with the dressing. Sprinkle with salt, black pepper and red pepper flakes (if using) and place croutons on top. Toss again to combine and serve!
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Instructions
  1. Place chicken a large Ziploc baggie with 1/3 cup balsamic vinegar, lemon zest and juice, oregano and ½ tsp salt and ¼ tsp black pepper. Seal bag and gently toss (over the sink – yes, I’ve learned the hard way! J) to combine. Marinade for 30 minutes, up to overnight. Pull out of the fridge 30 minutes prior to cooking.
  2. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F and line two small sheet pans with foil.
  3. While oven is heating up, on one sheet pan, place the tomatoes and on the other sheet pan, lay the sourdough out, in an even layer. Drizzle the tomatoes and sourdough with ½ tbsp olive oil each and sprinkle both with salt and black pepper. Set the croutons aside and place the tomatoes into the oven to roast for 7-10 minutes until slightly browned and starting to burst open.
  4. Using tongs, pull the chicken out of the bag and place each piece in an even layer, without touching, onto a large nonstick skillet over medium heat; discard the remaining marinade. Let cook for 2-3 minutes per side, until each piece is cooked through.
  5. Meanwhile, in a large salad/serving bowl place spinach, basil, goat cheese and avocado.
  6. When you’re ready to pull the tomatoes out of the oven, place sourdough on the top rack of the oven to toast for 2-3 minutes and pour the tomatoes, while hot, in with the spinach and then add the chicken.
  7. Drizzle remaining olive oil and balsamic over the top and toss gently to combine and coat with the dressing. Sprinkle with salt, black pepper and red pepper flakes (if using) and place croutons on top. Toss again to combine and serve!
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Mindset & Meditation: Mental Resilience

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Mental Resilience…

 

“You have power over your mind, not outside events. Realize this, and you will find strength – Marcus Aurelius

 

Most of us are familiar with the concept of mental toughness and/or having an “unbreakable mindset”. I have been practicing mental toughness for years as an endurance athlete and coach, but only realized recently that what I have REALLY been practicing is mental resilience. Being able to gut out the last several reps in a hard workout, pushing through the pain during the last few miles of a race, or being able to handle difficult situations in life, like being exhausted but still mustering the strength to get through the day. That is mental resilience.  Defined as“the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats or significant sources of stress”, mental resilience is something we all possess, but most of us rarely tap into.Allow me to give you a few examples.

 

I first really learned how to differentiate mental toughness with mental resilience at a men’s retreat last fall.  A former Army Special Forces Operator came to our event to talk to us about this topic and take us through a workout. The workout was a 10 minute Sandbag Get-up test, where each man would hoist an 80lb sandbag over his shoulder and proceed to complete as many Get-ups as possible within a 10 minute time period. During the test you could switch shoulders as needed and you could put the bag on the ground BUT only for 5 breaths, then you had to pick it up and continue moving.  Quitting was not an option. Each man had a partner that was responsible for counting your reps out-loud and motivating/pushing you to keep moving.  This was the longest/hardest 10 minutes of my life, but I did not quit. I completed 65 get-ups. His top tier athletes complete 120 (insert big eyes emoji).  After the first few minutes my lungs were on fire, my legs quivered, and I felt like my soul was dying but I did not stop.  I focused on one rep at a time, pushing air in and out of my lungs, and knowing that this would eventually end.  After the exercise was complete he explained to us that this was a test of our mental resilience. He said that he aloud us to take the “break” of 5 breaths when needed, BUT every break was a small version of quitting… What??!!! He then explained, in a life and death situation such as combat, you MUST possess the mental resilience to keep moving and not stop. Otherwise you die…

 

Former Navy SEAL Commander Mark Divine, founder of www.unbeatablemind.comsites in his book Unbeatable Mind, that the human body is capable of 20 times more than we think we are. He calls this our “20X Factor”. During the infamous BUDS Hell Week, the candidates are put through continuous training for 5 ½ days, 24hrs a day, while constantly being submerged in the freezing waters of the Pacific Ocean. During this literal hell week the candidates are given only 4 hours of sleep.  Why 4 hours? Because that is the minimal amount of sleep the human body can have in that time frame without literally dying.  This continuous beat down day in and out while freezing, hungry, and tired breaks the candidates physically for sure, but moreover it breaks them down mentally. It is often said in BUDS that it’s not the strongest or fastest guys that make it through, it is the guys with the mental resilience that they cannot and will not stop or be broken. In a life or death situation such as combat, you MUST possess the ability to push forward regardless of circumstance.  Once the candidates realize they CAN keep going, a whole new realm of possibility and confidence sets in, and their ability to withstand mental and physical stress is multiplied 20 times over.

 

Taking it down a notch from military/combat situations, I have experienced and seen mental resilience at every Ironman triathlon that I have ever raced or supported.  We see it all the time in athletes and has been talked about for several years now in endurance events like Ironman, yet instead of being called mental resilience, it is referred to as the “Central Governor Theory”, wherein an athlete has the ability to mentally override a fatigued broken down body and muster up the power to run faster towards the end of the 26.2 mile run of an Ironman after the 2.4 mile swim and a 112 mile bike portions of the race.  I have witnessed athletes barely being able to put one foot in front of the other for 24-25 miles of an Ironman but as soon as they “smell the barn”, here the music at the finish line or sense that they are close, almost miraculously their once completely broken down legs go from doing what’s known as the Ironman shuffle into a full blown run.  Personally, every Ironman I have ran I have experienced this. As soon as I reach mile 20, knowing I only have a 10k left to run my pace increases significantly. It hurts like hell, but I have the resilience to persevere through the last few miles faster than before. I could just shuffle to the finish, but I grit my teeth, literally put my head down, embrace the pain and run like hell.

 

The aforementioned scenarios may sound interesting, inspiring, or down right insane, and you may be saying to yourself “well that’s not me”. “I’m not a Navy SEAL and don’t ever see myself racing an Ironman”.  So I give you this final example of being a new parent. Although I have not had the experience of being a new parent, the stories from friends, and clients telling of constant sleepless nights and fatigue for up to a year or more, are well known amongst this group of folks.  I use this as an example of mental resilience because often times in the absence of a tiny little life to maintain, if someone were to experience that level of sleeplessness and fatigue they would surely shut down, call in “sick”, etc.  Yet because they have no choice, they forge a mental resilience to push through the fatigue and carry on with life, work, and responsibilities.  It is in no way shape or form easy, but remember, mental resilience isn’t about not feeling pain or discomfort, but rather diving head first into it and not looking up until you have accomplished the mission or the goal.  Mental resilience is not a “want to”, it’s a “have to” mindset.

Health Episode #7 Why You Need to Lift Heavy & Muse Headband Feedback

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In this episode Mo and Alix discuss the importance of lifting heavy weight and how/when to incorporate into your training plan. Whether you are an endurance athlete or just trying to be health conscience and reduce your risk of bone loss and strength as you age, EVERYONE needs to lift heavy occasionally. Contrary to popular belief, lifting heavy, when done correctly WILL NOT make you big…

Also, Mo goes into deeper review of the Muse mediation headband. Learn how you can take your meditation and mindfulness practice to the next level.

CLICK HERE to listen or download from iTunes or Stitcher

Episode 151: Interview with Beast & Ultra-Beast Champ Frankie Disomma

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In this episode Miles and I chat with one of the Beasts from the Northeast, see what I did there :-), Frankie Disomma. This was an AWESOME interview and Frankie gives us some great insight and advice on:

  • How to train with a busy travel schedule
  • How to train in an office cubicle… Seriously 🙂
  • Why the Burpee Pull-up is his favorite “go to” body weight training exercise
  • How doing “miles of lunges” has been part of his hip injury rehab
  • Why you should treat your goals like the flame of a candle
  • How to stay focused during an injury
  • Why you should ALWAYS run with socks :-0
  • Planking during conference calls and more!

Seriously you will be motivated and educated at the end of this show!!

CLICK HERE to listen or download from iTunes or Stitcher! Also, if you like the information you hear and know of someone that could benefit please share our episode with them.

Follow Frankie on IG: @frankiedisomma07

Cleansing Spring Vegetable Soup

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Spring is here and tis the season for cleansing! As holistic nutritionists, one of the things Mo and I focus on in educating clients is eating seasonally and the importance of that for the body!

If you think about it intuitively – as the seasons change, you likely crave different things. For example: when it’s cold outside you want a big bowl of chili or a hearty plate of creamy cauliflower rice risotto… Okay, okay, or maybe just good ‘ol risotto! 😉 And when the warmer months come around, a shake or smoothie might start sounding really good for Breakfast or perhaps a chilled soup or more vegetables and/or fish than heavy meats.

Now, think about it ancestrally – “back in the day” so to speak, there were no year-round-fully-stocked produce sections or butchers that carried any kind of meat any time of year, like we have access to now. The food people ate was because it was available per the season.

I’m not saying that in the colder months you should never have something that might not have been available to our ancestors. But what I am saying is that you should at least consider it. And know that when something is not in season, you will get very little of the nutritional value out of said thing but when it is in season, that is when it is chalked full of it’s nutrients!

Alllll of that to say: I came up with this Spring Vegetable Soup recipe while I was doing a spring detox – nothing major – only 4 days – just with the goal of resetting a bit and cleansing my liver from toxins, etc. I honestly haven’t been feeling right hormonally, emotionally, etc. for the last few months and with spring upon us it seemed like a welcome invitation to do some bodily spring cleaning, if you will! And no, before anyone asks – I’m not pregnant! Ha! 😉

This soup comes together very simply and make wonderful leftovers! It is just as good chilled as it is warm! But the best part? It is FULL of anti-inflammatory, cleansing foods! The mung beans in particular are chalked full of fiber and they taste amazing on their own too!

So while you may not be inclined to a liver detox of sorts, I hope you will make this and incorporate some cleansing foods into your spring!

We hope you enjoy as much as we do!

Cleansing Spring Vegetable Soup

Serves 2-4

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup mung beans, soaked for 30 minutes
  • 1-2 strips kombu dashi (optional)
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 small yellow onion, finely chopped
  • 4 stalks celery, thinly sliced
  • 4 carrots, unpeeled and thinly sliced into coins
  • 2 yellow squash, halved and thinly sliced
  • 4 small zucchini, halved and thinly sliced
  • Real Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 2 pinches dried oregano
  • 1 pinch dried thyme
  • 1 tbsp cumin
  • 1 tsp ground turmeric
  • pinch of cayenne pepper
  • 1 can low sodium diced tomatoes
  • 1 quart beef or chicken bone broth or vegetable broth
  • 1-2 cups filtered water
  • 1 small container pre-washed baby spinach

Directions:

  • Place mung beans and kombu into a medium pot with 3 cups filtered water and a good pinch of salt, bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer – continue to simmer, uncovered until beans are softened – approx. 25 minutes. Set aside.
  • While beans are cooking, chop all vegetables.
  • Warm olive oil in a large soup pot over medium heat. Place all vegetables (this can be done one by one as you finish chopping them…) into the pot with a pinch of salt. Let the vegetables cook down a bit, until softened – approx. 10 minutes + another 5 minutes once all vegetables are added to the pot, if adding as you chop.
  • Add in remaining seasonings and stir well to combine.
  • Then add diced tomatoes, broth and water. Stir to combine and bring to a boil. Turn heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 15 minutes.
  • Drain mung beans and stir into the soup and let continue to simmer for 5 more minutes.
  • Turn heat off and add in spinach – stir to combine and wilt spinach.
  • Serve in big bowls as is or with a crusty piece of good sourdough bread or my 5-minute Grain Free Bread!

 

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Instructions
  1. Place mung beans and kombu into a medium pot with 3 cups filtered water and a good pinch of salt, bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer – continue to simmer, uncovered until beans are softened - approx. 25 minutes. Set aside.
  2. While beans are cooking, chop all vegetables.
  3. Warm olive oil in a large soup pot over medium heat. Place all vegetables (this can be done one by one as you finish chopping them…) into the pot with a pinch of salt. Let the vegetables cook down a bit, until softened – approx. 10 minutes + another 5 minutes once all vegetables are added to the pot, if adding as you chop.
  4. Add in remaining seasonings and stir well to combine.
  5. Then add diced tomatoes, broth and water. Stir to combine and bring to a boil. Turn heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 15 minutes.
  6. Drain mung beans and stir into the soup and let continue to simmer for 5 more minutes.
  7. Turn heat off and add in spinach – stir to combine and wilt spinach.
  8. Serve in big bowls as is or with a crusty piece of good sourdough bread or my 5-minute Grain Free Bread!
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Mindset & Meditation: Muse Headband

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Muse Headband Review…

 

After many meditation sessions, guided, repeating mantras, and some with sound only for a year now I thought I had a pretty solid grasp on “being present” and focusing on my breath, a visualization, or something similar.  Then I discovered the Muse Brain Sensing Meditation Headband; you can check them out at www.choosemuse.com.  I called their headquarters for more information and spoke to one of their representatives for about 15 minutes.

 

I was intrigued by the ability to quantify our ability to focus on a single thing, such as breath. When wearing the muse headband during a meditation it can detect when your brain begins to lose focus and your mind begins to wander.  It then gives you instant feedback based on what you are listening to. For example, if I am meditating and listening to ocean waves on the muse app, the water sounds calm like small waves washing onto the shore.  When I lose focus on my breath the smooth calm waves become louder like crashing waves, nothing violent that or excessively loud, but enough to bring your attention back to your breath.  After each session the Muse app gives you a diagram comparing the time during the session that your mind was calm, neutral, or active (see photo above). Your goal is to increase your calm time and reduce your active time.  The ability to remain focused on a subject/object/etc. is crucial to maximize your ability to visualize during meditation.  For me, I thought I was able to remain focused, but turns out my mind begins to lose focus each time I exhaled.  It was quiet interesting and really made me think about how to remain focused. This has actually helped me stay focused during daily tasks. It’s pretty cool.

 

Using the Muse headband just before working on an important project/assignment as a busy adult, on a paper or studies if you are a student, or even prior to exams can help you retain a calm focused mind. I recently saw a news segment about meditation where a 5thgrader would meditate prior to a test to help her stay calm and focused. I think incorporating the Muse headband could help increase focus and a sense of calm presence even more.  If you practice meditation or even if you are thinking of beginning a meditation practice, which you should J, I encourage you to give the Muse headband a try. In our fast paced, over-stimulated, multi-tasking on top of other multi-tasking world, having the ability to calm our mind and thoughts and truly be present for just a few minutes a day could be just what you, I, we need.

 

 

Episode 150: David Mainprize talks Conquer the Gauntlet Race Series

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In this episode Miles and I chat with Conquer the Gauntlet co-owner David Mainprize. David gives us some great insight on:

  • What it takes to run/put on a race, the costs
  • Why volunteers are so important
  • His new kids specific race series
  • You’ll also learn why Mo and Miles will never be race owners/directors 🙂

This is a great interview and if you have kids that want to get involved in OCR this is definitely an episode you will want to listen to!

CLICK HERE to listen or download from iTunes, Stitcher, or SoundCloud

Check out CTG Youth series at www.conqueryouth.com